Roman oratory and the EU referendum campaigns

In addition to marking a politically decisive moment in British history, the campaigns in advance of the referendum on the UK’s membership in the EU were exciting objects of study for Classicists in terms of the political use of oratory, writes Gesine Manuwald, Professor of Latin at UCL. In addition to marking a politically decisive moment in British history, the campaigns in advance of the … Continue reading Roman oratory and the EU referendum campaigns

So what does Angela Merkel think? Germany’s reactions towards the new British government

Nina Trentmann, UK Business Correspondent at Die Welt, takes a look at the recent appointment of Boris Johnson as UK Foreign Secretary and the reactions of politicians in Germany to this news, particularly in the context of future negotiation tactis between the UK and the EU. It was a shock. German politicians, their French counterparts, EU representatives – they all shook their head in disbelief when … Continue reading So what does Angela Merkel think? Germany’s reactions towards the new British government

You can’t blame Brussels for Brexit

Ronan McCrea, Barrister and Senior Lecturer in Law at UCL, argues that it is not clear that the EU is any less accountable than national governments. The claim that the EU is undemocratic and unaccountable is made so often it seems to be an accepted background to any discussion of the union. The charges levelled against it assert that EU institutions are unelected, unaccountable, and … Continue reading You can’t blame Brussels for Brexit

Exit plan: how Scotland and Northern Ireland can remain in the EU

Public discussions about how the UK is to exit from the European Union have been too simplified, and have failed to come up with any solution that recognises that only England and Wales in fact voted to leave. Brendan O’Leary, Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, outlines a way forward where those nations wanting to remain in the EU might be able … Continue reading Exit plan: how Scotland and Northern Ireland can remain in the EU

Brexit: The mother of all uncertainties

In the aftermath of last week’s EU referendum, the only thing we can be certain of is uncertainty, writes Professor Paul Ekins, Director of the UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources, as he outlines two absolutely contrasting scenarios. So the British people have voted by a margin of around 4%, a little more than 1 million votes, to leave the European Union (EU). Where this will lead lies somewhere … Continue reading Brexit: The mother of all uncertainties