Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat ‘public paranoia’ over immigration

Thomas Gift argues that convincing the public about the merits of international students requires appealing to self-interest in addition to pinpointing their intangible benefits on diversity and multiculturalism. Universities should make a stronger case for this, particularly in the context of Brexit.  Continue reading Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat ‘public paranoia’ over immigration

Brexit: German Universities among those Poised to Benefit if Researchers and Funding Shift

UK universities stand to suffer from Brexit, while universities across Europe and particularly in Germany are likely to benefit. Aline Courtois and a recent report from the Centre for Global Higher Education compare the expectations of European university leaders and staff regarding the post-Brexit future of Higher Education. Continue reading Brexit: German Universities among those Poised to Benefit if Researchers and Funding Shift

EU Students at UK Universities: Patterns & Trends

What Brexit will mean for UK universities varies from institution to institution. Much data on Brexit’s impact focuses on sector-wide aggregates, the forest that hides the trees. The UK provides excellent teaching and research, as illustrated by the number of its universities ranked in the top 10, 50 or 100 in the world. Yet despite its world-class reputation, the UK’s Higher Education sector is hierarchical, and various layers will be affected differently. Ludovic Highman explores the sector’s diversity in this regard. Continue reading EU Students at UK Universities: Patterns & Trends

Brexit and higher education

Sir Peter Scott, Emeritus Professor of Higher Educational Studies at the UCL Institute of Education, outlines the implications which Brexit will have for UK universities. Although noting that much is uncertain, he outlines four areas in which negative impact is identifiable: student exchanges (largely through the Erasmus programme), the recruitment of students from other EU countries, the employment of academic and research staff from the rest of the EU, and research grants and income from EU programmes. He argues that Brexit could undermine both the financial sustainability of UK univerisities, as well as the overall quality of their scholarship. Continue reading Brexit and higher education

EU referendum: the view of a UCL clinician-scientist

John Martin, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at UCL, argues that scientific advance relies on creativity, cooperation, and financing. To leave the EU would diminish all three, dimming the light of British science in the world and threatening the UK’s future economy. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. For more on this topic, join the UCL European Institute for its high-level panel discussion EU Membership and UK Science on 12 May. Continue reading EU referendum: the view of a UCL clinician-scientist