Post-Brexit Trade Relations: No Middle Way Between Free Trade Agreement and Internal Market

Piet Eeckhout and Clément Leroy examine various models for the UK-EU trade relationship after Brexit, and argue that a so-called bespoke agreement beyond existing frameworks is not available. This blog draws on Piet Eeckhout’s report Future trade relations between the EU and the UK: options after Brexit, which he is presenting to the European Parliament’s International Trade Committee on Thursday 17 May (watch here).  The future trade relationship between the … Continue reading Post-Brexit Trade Relations: No Middle Way Between Free Trade Agreement and Internal Market

A storm in a tea cup? Why all the fuss around the EU budget

Filipa Figueira, Teaching Fellow at UCL’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies, unpacks the politics and the emotional potential of the EU budget, and why Brexit might be good news in this regard.  Every seven years, the EU braces itself for a strange recurring phenomenon: Its comparatively small budget (only 1% of GNI; insignificant when compared to national governments’ budgets) becomes the focus of rapt attention from … Continue reading A storm in a tea cup? Why all the fuss around the EU budget

Brexit: German Universities among those Poised to Benefit if Researchers and Funding Shift

UK universities stand to suffer from Brexit, while universities across Europe and particularly in Germany are likely to benefit. Aline Courtois and a recent report from the Centre for Global Higher Education compare the expectations of European university leaders and staff regarding the post-Brexit future of Higher Education. Continue reading Brexit: German Universities among those Poised to Benefit if Researchers and Funding Shift

EU Students at UK Universities: Patterns & Trends

What Brexit will mean for UK universities varies from institution to institution. Much data on Brexit’s impact focuses on sector-wide aggregates, the forest that hides the trees. The UK provides excellent teaching and research, as illustrated by the number of its universities ranked in the top 10, 50 or 100 in the world. Yet despite its world-class reputation, the UK’s Higher Education sector is hierarchical, and various layers will be affected differently. Ludovic Highman explores the sector’s diversity in this regard. Continue reading EU Students at UK Universities: Patterns & Trends