Unsettling times for a settled population? Polish perspectives on Brexit

Many Poles have lived, worked, and settled in the UK for up to 12 years now. Anne White, Professor of Polish Studies at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies, says it’s no longer so easy for them to pick up and leave. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. When I was asked to write a piece about … Continue reading Unsettling times for a settled population? Polish perspectives on Brexit

Migration: it’s why the British people will vote for Brexit

Steven Woolfe, UKIP Member of the European Parliament, argues that uncontrolled EU migration costs Britain financially and increases the strain on public services, resulting in a lower quality of life for many Britons and a less generous nation. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. Migration is a critical issue in the UK’s EU referendum debate. We’ve seen poll after poll … Continue reading Migration: it’s why the British people will vote for Brexit

Brexit Divisions II: the mother of all migration debates

Migration will play a central role in the June EU referendum. The UCL European Institute’s Uta Staiger and Claudia Sternberg explore which arguments, facts, and strategies the campaigns will deploy to swing the vote in their favour. This article gives an overview of our second guest editor week on the topic on openDemocracy. Migration has emerged as perhaps the most prominent – and certainly challenging … Continue reading Brexit Divisions II: the mother of all migration debates

Some thoughts on the psycho-geography of Europe’s free movement

Eastern European migration takes place in a very different context than it once did. Eva Hoffman, author and essayist, asks what drives people to leave, and what drives them back again? This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. Cross-national movements – as we are all too aware these days – come in different forms and categories, reflected in the various designations … Continue reading Some thoughts on the psycho-geography of Europe’s free movement

Britain benefits from free movement

Voters often confuse internal and external EU migration, mistakenly assuming that a Brexit would better prevent non-EU nationals from ‘sneaking in’. Hugo Dixon, Chairman and Editor-in-chief of InFacts.org, thinks it won’t. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s second guest editor week on openDemocracy. The Treaty of Rome, which set up the forerunner to the EU, enshrined what are known as the ‘four freedoms’: free movement of goods, … Continue reading Britain benefits from free movement