COVID-19: The presence and pitfalls of evidence-based policy

Jonathan Kamkhaji, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of Exeter, and Claudio Radaelli, Professor of Public Policy at UCL, argue that the surprising nature of the coronavirus crisis means governments cannot base their response on scientific evidence alone. Across Europe, governments have responded to the spread of the coronavirus in different ways, both in terms of timing of the regulatory responses and in their content. Most … Continue reading COVID-19: The presence and pitfalls of evidence-based policy

Philosophy & public policy: lessons from COVID-19

UCL Philosophy Professor James Wilson explores the philosophical public health implications of the coronavirus.

I’m a philosopher of public health. Like most philosophers, I generally tend to take my time in thinking about problems. Philosophers pride ourselves on the carefulness and disinterestedness of our reasoning about ethical principles – seeking to make recommendations impartially rather than on the basis of whim, or the feelings of the moment. Continue reading Philosophy & public policy: lessons from COVID-19

Small States and Institutional Change: the Lesson of Brexit

Tomáš Weiss, Head of Department of European Studies and Jean Monnet Chair in EU International Relations and Diplomacy Studies at the Institute of International Studies, Charles University, Prague, argues that institutionalisation can empower small states. He notes their dependence on institutions can also make them vulnerable to institutional change, this is exemplified through the case of Czechia in the EU. This blog is part of … Continue reading Small States and Institutional Change: the Lesson of Brexit