How to Navigate the 2019 General Election: Views from UCL

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Brexit, tactical voting, the unity of the United Kingdom… The 12 December election is like no other in many ways. Our colleagues from across UCL offer their thoughts on how to approach the first winter poll since 1923. 

Read below our round-up of comments to prepare yourself for the upcoming vote.

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Climate Change and the Irony of Brexit

Albert Weale argues that at a time of a climate crisis trumping frontiers, international governance is needed more than ever. Leaving the EU and its structures of cooperation could thus be counterproductive for the UK as the country sets new bold and needed  environmental objectives. Brexit is full of ironies. Consider Mrs May’s recent announcement that the UK government will commit itself to net zero … Continue reading Climate Change and the Irony of Brexit

A second Brexit referendum: Democracy as discovery

In this last post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores how the result of a second referendum would be considered. Now that the options are clearly on the table for the electorate, a confirmatory vote would make sense for this “once in a generation” choice. I began this series of blogs by noting the fogginess of the UK’s constitutional … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: Democracy as discovery

A second Brexit referendum: The generation game

In this third post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores if it is right to say that the referendum was a “once in a generation” vote. For him, a second referendum would be similar to a “two-round” scrutiny now that a concrete leave option is on the table.  The 2016 Brexit referendum, we were often told during the campaign, … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The generation game

A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty

In this second post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores what it could possibly mean to say that the people are sovereign. As the sovereignty of the people can never exceed that given to them by the constitution and Parliament cannot bind its successors, he invites us to consider Brexit as a changing process rather than a one-off binding event.  … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty