What to do with (Eastern) Europeans after Brexit?

Based on an analysis of British mainstream print media coverage between 2006-2013, Dr Denny Pencheva examines how constructive engagement with EU nationals in the UK today is complicated by a history of divisive, racialised rhetoric, and persistent negative stereotyping of Eastern Europeans by the UK press, and argues for a more responsible approach to public debates on immigration, by politicians and the media. Continue reading What to do with (Eastern) Europeans after Brexit?

Why we must go beyond the “backsliding paradigm”

Seán Hanley, Associate Professor in Comparative Central and East European Politics, UCL SSEES and Licia Cianetti, Research Fellow at the Royal Holloway University of London, argue why we must move beyond the “backsliding paradigm” by demonstrating how it can lead to reproducing, in reverse, the transition paradigm. They draw on lessons from East-Central Europe to propose a broader focus. Continue reading Why we must go beyond the “backsliding paradigm”

Potemkin Parliamentarism and the Project to Redesign the Russian State Duma

Michal Murawski, Lecturer in Critical Area Studies, and Ben Noble, Lecturer in Russian Politics, both from UCL SSEES, describe the story of how an ambitious parliamentary speaker, inspired by a blog post shared on Facebook, attempted to redesign the State Duma building to make it appear more democratic. Continue reading Potemkin Parliamentarism and the Project to Redesign the Russian State Duma

‘We Can’t Be Afraid Anymore’ – Artists Behind the Frontline in Belarus

In her interviews with three Belarusian artists on their work portraying the recent political protests in Belarus, Pippa Crawford, Final Year Russian Studies Student at UCL SSEES, highlights the fundamental role art has played in the protests. Continue reading ‘We Can’t Be Afraid Anymore’ – Artists Behind the Frontline in Belarus