Why the European Council Must not Reject an Article 50 Extension Request

Professor Piet Eeckhout, Academic Director of the UCL European Institute and Dean of UCL Laws, outlines the legal reasons why the European Council must not refuse an extension of Article 50. He notes that a refusal, in the current context, would amount to expelling the UK against its will, which the judgement in the Wightman case deemed unlawful. The Brexit saga continues to evolve from … Continue reading Why the European Council Must not Reject an Article 50 Extension Request

Beyond Brexit: Towards a British Constitution

Brexit is a major constitutional change. It creates considerable constitutional uncertainty, but also opportunity. It could prove Britain’s constitutional moment. Vernon Bogdanor argues that just as joining the EU fundamentally altered the UK constitution, so Brexit could, by exposing the very nakedness of Britain’s uncodified arrangements, prove a catalyst for a written constitution. This blog draws from a lecture at UCL co-organised by the European Institute and the … Continue reading Beyond Brexit: Towards a British Constitution

Lies, Damn Lies and Leave.EU Leaflets

As the Brexit campaign heats up, many of us are receiving leaflets urging us to vote either “in” or “out”. Whilst it is to be expected that each camp will attempt to frame the argument in a way that favours its cause, the Leave.EU leaflet makes claims that are clearly misleading. UCL academics Randoph Bruno, Filipa Fiquiera and Jan Kubik set the record straight. Leave.EU … Continue reading Lies, Damn Lies and Leave.EU Leaflets

Facts of Life: How Michael Gove misrepresents the effects of EU law and the ECJ case law

In his response to the Treasury’s report on Brexit, Michael Gove argued that EU Law and the European Court of Justice are responsible for imposing undesirable laws on the British public. In this post, Piet Eeckhout, Professor of EU Law at UCL, examines to what extent Gove’s claims stand up to close scrutiny. The Brexit debate is starting to crystallise. The Treasury’s report on the … Continue reading Facts of Life: How Michael Gove misrepresents the effects of EU law and the ECJ case law

Losing citizenship and democratic authority in Europe

Damian Chalmers, Professor of EU Law at LSE and Fellow of UK in a Changing Europe, argues that the EU will continue to be perceived as authoritarian until it reforms its relationship with national citizenship and political community. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. When the EU’s heads of state and government met in Laeken in 2001 to start the … Continue reading Losing citizenship and democratic authority in Europe