February 24th, or what binds Europeans together?

Michael Wilkinson compares how Europe is responding to Putin’s invasion of Ukraine to European responses to the Iraq war and the multiple crises it faced in the last 20 years. Will this new war bind Europeans together, and will this make Europe more, or less, democratic? Continue reading February 24th, or what binds Europeans together?

Far from Paris: Ukrainian Literature and Independence

Why did Ukrainian poets long to die in Paris at the end of the Soviet era? And how did the yearning for Europe manifest itself in the literature of independent Ukraine? Uilleam Blacker explores three thriving decades in the history of Ukrainian literature, from a symbolically significant poem ‘We Will Not Die in Paris’ by Natalka Bilotserkivets and the experiments of the ‘Bu-Ba-Bu’ group to the powerful new war writing by Olena Stiazhkina, Serhii Zhadan and Olesya Khromeychuk. Continue reading Far from Paris: Ukrainian Literature and Independence

A New Impulse – But For Which Europe?

The triumph of the principle of competition among and within European member states has generated a continuous aggravation of disparities, writes Etienne Balibar in a special long read. Not that the French philosopher allows this to stop him stubbornly envisioning a Europe other than that of bankers, technocrats and political profiteers. Europe is dead, long live Europe? Since the beginning of a year in which elections … Continue reading A New Impulse – But For Which Europe?

Eurotrashing euroscepticism

The European Union is a system founded on consensus-building and collaborative problem solving. Dr Simon Usherwood argues that it is for this reason very important for politicians to listen to the voices of Eurosceptics and other critics and to engage them in conversation. In true Eurotrash style, I’m writing this as I fly to Italy, where I’m attending a workshop on studying the EU. The event, jointly run by … Continue reading Eurotrashing euroscepticism

Five minutes with Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol: “The UK already opts out of anything it dislikes; it could very well end up leaving the EU on an entirely flawed debate”

In an interview with UCL’s Claudia Sternberg, Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol, Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Fellow at the University of Glasgow’s Adam Smith Business School, discusses today’s EU referendum from the perspective of the last 50 years of the UK’s presence in EU. In what ways is today’s EU referendum different from the June 1975 precedent? The difference is that in 1974 the actual renegotiations started fairly … Continue reading Five minutes with Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol: “The UK already opts out of anything it dislikes; it could very well end up leaving the EU on an entirely flawed debate”