Brexit EU Citizenship Rights of UK Nationals and the Court of Justice

What will happen to the EU citizenship rights of UK nationals after Brexit? A Dutch Court has caused quite a stir by making a reference to the European Court of Justice on the issue. Ronan McCrea explains why the Court of Justice should not, and probably won’t, accept it.  Quite a stir has been generated by the decision of a Dutch court to make a reference … Continue reading Brexit EU Citizenship Rights of UK Nationals and the Court of Justice

Acquired rights and the ECJ

In the second blog post of the series on Brexit and the ECJ, Piet Eeckhout, Dean of UCL Laws and Academic Director of the UCL European Institute, discusses citizens’ acquired rights and ECJ jurisdiction post-Brexit. Assessing the EU’s position on the issue, he argues that, although rather extravagant at first glance, it is not as unreasonable as it may seem. In the Brexit negotiations the … Continue reading Acquired rights and the ECJ

EU Citizens as Bargaining Chips

Virginia Mantouvalou, Reader in Human Rights and Labour Law and Co-Director of the UCL Institute for Human Rights, looks at the implications for Brexit on the rights of EU citizens living in the UK in relation to the European Convention on Human Rights. A few days after the referendum on EU membership of the European Union, Theresa May stated that she would not guarantee the … Continue reading EU Citizens as Bargaining Chips

Undecided on the EU referendum? These are the three questions to ask yourself

If there is one thing people can agree on as they prepare to vote on the UK’s EU membership: comprehensive, comprehensible and trustworthy information is in short supply. Every day, the quality of the debate sinks to a new low – yet the stakes are as high as ever, writes Uta Staiger, Executive Director of the UCL European Institute. How, then, are you supposed to … Continue reading Undecided on the EU referendum? These are the three questions to ask yourself

Brexit, Immigration And £100

Simon Wren-Lewis, Professor of Economics at Oxford University, writes that the EU referendum boils down to economics versus immigration, but that economics wins out when put to the test. With so many heavyweights, from Barack Obama to Mark Carney, saying that we will be worse off with Brexit, why are the polls still neck and neck? There seem to me two reasonable explanations: that the … Continue reading Brexit, Immigration And £100