A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty

In this second post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores what it could possibly mean to say that the people are sovereign. As the sovereignty of the people can never exceed that given to them by the constitution and Parliament cannot bind its successors, he invites us to consider Brexit as a changing process rather than a one-off binding event.  … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty

How could a second Brexit referendum be triggered?

With ‘exit day’ less than six months away, public debate about a second Brexit vote continues. In this new post on this topic, Jess Sargeant, Alan Renwick and Meg Russell outline the key decision points and processes by which MPs or the government might choose to trigger a second referendum. In our previous blogpost we considered how long it would take to hold a second referendum on Brexit, concluding that … Continue reading How could a second Brexit referendum be triggered?

Is a second referendum on Brexit possible? Seven questions that need to be answered

Two years on from the Brexit vote, the benefits of a second referendum are being hotly debated. In this post, UCL’s Jess Sargeant, Alan Renwick and Meg Russell identify seven questions that should be considered before parliament decides whether a second Brexit referendum will take place. Last week a Sky poll suggested that 50% of the public would favour a three-way referendum on the UK’s future relationship with the … Continue reading Is a second referendum on Brexit possible? Seven questions that need to be answered

Second Thoughts on a Second Brexit Referendum

Richard Bellamy discusses the circumstances that would allow for a second referendum to take place. Beyond the difficulties to overcome a potential “betrayal” effect, the design of this new vote would be highly controversial and it does not seem likely that Justine Greening’s system of first and second preferences would make it more legitimate in the eyes of the electorate and politicians.   Theresa May has … Continue reading Second Thoughts on a Second Brexit Referendum

An Accidental Brexit: a Disorderly Referendum and Illusions of a ‘Global Britain’

Taking a macroeconomic perspective, Paul Welfens reflects what the findings of his book ‘An Accidental Brexit’ mean in light of new developments in the Brexit negotiations. He argues that if the true economic consequences had been known, the referendum would have turned out differently and shows the potential pitfalls of the ‘Global Britain’ approach to international trade. The joint statement by PM May and President of the European … Continue reading An Accidental Brexit: a Disorderly Referendum and Illusions of a ‘Global Britain’