A No Deal Brexit is not the wish of the country but is now the preferred outcome for Leave voters

Uta Staiger, Christina Pagel and Christabel Cooper share the results of the last UCL survey (with fieldwork conducted by YouGov), which was generously funded by UCL Maths, UCL CORU and UCL’s Grand Challenge of Cultural Understanding. The data shows that with No-Deal now leavers’ preferred Brexit outcome, ruling it out could create problems for the Tories. Leave voters are also relatively untroubled by the economic impact of no-deal – in … Continue reading A No Deal Brexit is not the wish of the country but is now the preferred outcome for Leave voters

A second Brexit referendum: The generation game

In this third post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores if it is right to say that the referendum was a “once in a generation” vote. For him, a second referendum would be similar to a “two-round” scrutiny now that a concrete leave option is on the table.  Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The generation game

A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty

In this second post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores what it could possibly mean to say that the people are sovereign. As the sovereignty of the people can never exceed that given to them by the constitution and Parliament cannot bind its successors, he invites us to consider Brexit as a changing process rather than a one-off binding event.  … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The myth of popular sovereignty

A second Brexit referendum: The problem of constitutional agency

In this first post in a series of 4 for the Political Quarterly, Albert Weale explores the reasoning behind the belief that running a second referendum would not be democratic. As a core British constitutional principle relies on the fact that Parliament cannot bind its successors, he invites us to consider Brexit as a changing process rather than a one-off binding event.    There might … Continue reading A second Brexit referendum: The problem of constitutional agency

Turn out or else: do referendum campaigns actually change voters’ minds?

Over £9m has been spent on leaflets for all British household outlining the arguments in favour of remaining in the EU. But do campaign activities actually sway voters in referendums? Would campaigners do best to try to change minds, or simply motivate their supporters to turn out at the polls? Which arguments will prove decisive? Sara Hobolt, Professor at the LSE European Institute, and Sara Hagemann, … Continue reading Turn out or else: do referendum campaigns actually change voters’ minds?