Who did Twitter users blame for Brexit?

Much of the acrimonious debate on Brexit of the past few years played out on Twitter. But the sheer volume of Tweets on the subject, and the oft-cited ‘echo chamber’ phenomenon make it difficult to gauge what this conversation looked like. What kind of messages were prominent on Twitter? Which side of the Brexit debate was strongest? How did this change over time? How were Theresa May and Boris Johnson judged in their tenure as prime minister? Continue reading Who did Twitter users blame for Brexit?

Looking Back at the EU Future Relationship Act

Jeff King is Professor of Law at UCL Faculty of Laws, and a Legal Adviser to the House of Lords Select Committee on the Constitution. In this long read, he explores the constitutional implications of the quick passage of the European Union (Future Relationship) Act. This piece is an expansion of a Twitter thread posted on 30 December, 2020 in reaction to the bill’s passage. Continue reading Looking Back at the EU Future Relationship Act

Influencing the European Green Deal and Industrial Strategy: Leaders and Laggards among Small EU States

David Gow, Editor of Sceptical.scot, assesses the strategies which smaller EU member states use to influence EU industrial and green strategy. Focusing on success stories like Finland and Denmark, he outlines important lessons for Scotland. Continue reading Influencing the European Green Deal and Industrial Strategy: Leaders and Laggards among Small EU States

Brexit is a golden opportunity for British fishing

In June 2017 the UCL European Institute hosted a public discussion on the impact of Brexit on fisheries and maritime policy. Aaron Brown, a skipper from pro-Brexit campaign group Fishing for Leave, was one of the speakers. Here, he outlines why Brexit could be a boon for UK fishermen, coastal communities and the wider economy. He stresses, however, that it is down to the government … Continue reading Brexit is a golden opportunity for British fishing

Managing the new parliament: some challenges for Theresa May’s minority government

The unexpected election result leaves the Conservatives seeking to establish a minority government, with support from the Democratic Unionist Party’s ten MPs. With fewer than half the seats in the House of Commons, and barely more than half when adding the DUP, Theresa May’s new government will face many additional challenges in parliament. UCL Constitution Unit Director Meg Russell explores some of the clearest examples. Following … Continue reading Managing the new parliament: some challenges for Theresa May’s minority government