Understanding the EU’s negotiating position on trade in the Brexit negotiations

Luis González García considers the specificity of the EU trade policy to explain the perceived rigidity of the EU negotiators on Brexit. The EU applies two approaches to its trade policy through either integration (strong regulatory alignment and strong market access) or liberalisation (looser arrangements): this explains why an ad hoc model which offers full market access but does not ensure a level playing field cannot … Continue reading Understanding the EU’s negotiating position on trade in the Brexit negotiations

Sustainability: the invisible common ground between the Italian problem and reforms in Europe

According to Marc Brightman, the problems of migration and economic stagnation, often referenced as the causes of the votes for Brexit or populist parties in Italy, should be treated together as part of a single problem of sustainability. An opportunity exists to exploit the rather consensual ground of environmental economics and ecological economics in European negotiations to agree on reforms for Italy and the other … Continue reading Sustainability: the invisible common ground between the Italian problem and reforms in Europe

Post-Brexit Trade Relations: No Middle Way Between Free Trade Agreement and Internal Market

Piet Eeckhout and Clément Leroy examine various models for the UK-EU trade relationship after Brexit, and argue that a so-called bespoke agreement beyond existing frameworks is not available. This blog draws on Piet Eeckhout’s report Future trade relations between the EU and the UK: options after Brexit, which he is presenting to the European Parliament’s International Trade Committee on Thursday 17 May (watch here).  The future trade relationship between the … Continue reading Post-Brexit Trade Relations: No Middle Way Between Free Trade Agreement and Internal Market

A storm in a tea cup? Why all the fuss around the EU budget

Filipa Figueira, Teaching Fellow at UCL’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies, unpacks the politics and the emotional potential of the EU budget, and why Brexit might be good news in this regard.  Every seven years, the EU braces itself for a strange recurring phenomenon: Its comparatively small budget (only 1% of GNI; insignificant when compared to national governments’ budgets) becomes the focus of rapt attention from … Continue reading A storm in a tea cup? Why all the fuss around the EU budget

An Accidental Brexit: a Disorderly Referendum and Illusions of a ‘Global Britain’

Taking a macroeconomic perspective, Paul Welfens reflects what the findings of his book ‘An Accidental Brexit’ mean in light of new developments in the Brexit negotiations. He argues that if the true economic consequences had been known, the referendum would have turned out differently and shows the potential pitfalls of the ‘Global Britain’ approach to international trade. The joint statement by PM May and President of the European … Continue reading An Accidental Brexit: a Disorderly Referendum and Illusions of a ‘Global Britain’